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The impact of anaphylaxis on the quality of life and mental health of adults
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  • Rebecca Knibb,
  • Aarnoud Huissoon,
  • Richard Baretto,
  • Anjali Ekbote,
  • Sham Onyango-Odera,
  • Cassandra Screti,
  • Kristina Newman L,
  • MAMIDIPUDI THIRUMALA KRISHNA
Rebecca Knibb
Aston University College of Health and Life Sciences
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Aarnoud Huissoon
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Richard Baretto
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Anjali Ekbote
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Sham Onyango-Odera
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Cassandra Screti
Aston University College of Health and Life Sciences
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Kristina Newman L
Nottingham Trent University
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MAMIDIPUDI THIRUMALA KRISHNA
University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
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Abstract

Background. Anaphylaxis is a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction which has a detrimental impact on quality of life (QoL), however little is known about the impact of anaphylaxis, across the various causes, on adults. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of anaphylaxis on QoL and mental health in adults. Methods. Participants (n=142; 60% female) were recruited from a regional allergy centre (Birmingham, U.K) following systematic specialist evaluation. They completed measures of generic QoL (WHOQoL BREF), anaphylaxis specific QoL (A-QoL-Adults), anxiety and depression (HADS) and stress (PSS). Results. Anaphylaxis triggers were mainly to medication or during general anaesthesia (29.6%), food (29.6%), wasp or bee venom (16.2%), or were spontaneous (21.1%). Adults with anaphylaxis had significantly poorer general QoL and stress than published data from a healthy population. Females had significantly poorer anxiety and depression than norm data (all p<0.01). Poorer anaphylaxis specific QoL was significantly related to greater stress, depression, anxiety, poorer general QoL and demographic and clinical variables such as age, gender, severity of anaphylaxis, presence of other atopic conditions (all p<0.05). Regression analysis showed that anxiety, depression and number of anaphylactic reactions were significant predictors for anaphylaxis specific QoL. Conclusions. Anaphylaxis has an adverse impact on QoL and mental health of adults across different triggers. Anxiety, depression and number of reactions in particular seem to be important in explaining the impact on QoL and should be of particular note for clinicians managing adults with this condition, and when considering specialist psychological support.